White Paper on Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in Nursing Educational Programs for the California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (CCEPD)

A White Paper on Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in Nursing Educational Programs is available on the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) website. This paper also presents a new model of technical standards inclusive of all students with and without  disabilities

White Paper on Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in Nursing Educational Programs
for the California Committee on Employment of  People with Disabilities (CCEPD)

Nurses  are  challenged  to  fill  the  new  and  expanded  roles  for  a  health  care  system  designed  to improve the quality  of  health  care.  Despite  the  unique  perspective  and  set  of  skills  that students and health professionals with disabilities have to address many of these challenges, people  with  disabilities  are  often effectively  excluded from  the  nursing  profession. The purposes of this white paper are to 1) frame the issues that prevent applicants with disabilities from entering nursing education and the nursing profession and 2) propose the changes necessary to engage the potential of people with disabilities to enhance nursing leadership and innovation  necessary  to transform  health  care.  Major  barriers  include  the  following: 1) outmoded admission standards that deter applicants with disabilities; 2) misconceptions about the capacity of students with disabilities to function effectively in the clinical components of nursing education; and, 3) lack of a comprehensive understanding of issues related to patient safety. This paper begins with an historical overview of the journey toward the acceptance of nurses with disabilities, including civil rights legislation, judicial rulings with reference to specific landmark cases, and the development of current technical and educational standards. The paper also presents a new model of technical standards inclusive of all students with and without  disabilities, along with recommendations  supportive  of  students with  disabilities  in admission, matriculation and graduation from nursing programs.

Additional Resources

  1. A New Model of Technical Standard for Nursing Education Programs
  1. White Paper on Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in Nursing Educational Programs
  1. ADA Amendments Act and Accommodations


EEOC Sues Muskegon Family Care for Disability Discrimination

Medical Provider Fired Employee with a Disability, Federal Agency Charges

DETROIT – Muskegon Family Care, a medical services provider located in Muskegon, Heights, MI, violated federal law by firing an employee due to a disability, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) alleged in a lawsuit filed today.
According to EEOC’s suit, Avis Lane worked for Muskegon Family Care as an outreach enrollment coordinator for over a month when it fired her based on information obtained during her pre-employment physical.
Firing an employee due to a disability violates the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). EEOC filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court for the Western District of Michigan (EEOC v. M.G.H. Family Health Center d/b/a Muskegon Family Care, Civil Case No.: 1:15-CV-00952) after first attempting to reach a pre-litigation settlement through its conciliation process. EEOC’s lawsuit seeks back pay, compensatory damages, punitive damages, and injunctive relief — including a court order prohibiting Muskegon Family Care from firing disabled employees in the future.
“Firing a qualified employee, who successfully performed the job for over a month, based on information obtained during a physical violates the ADA,” said Laurie Young, regional attorney for EEOC’s Indianapolis District. “Employers cannot use recommendations from a third-party health examiner without determining for itself whether the employee can actually do the job.”
EEOC enforces federal laws prohibiting employment discrimination. Further information about EEOC is available on its web site at
www.eeoc.gov.

Supporting Nurses and Nursing Students with Disabilities

Supporting Nurses and Nursing Students with Disabilities
Neal-Boylan, Leslie PhD, RN, APRN, CRRN, FAAN; Marks, Beth PhD, RN; McCulloh, Karen J. BSN, RN
AJN, American Journal of Nursing:
October 2015 – Volume 115 – Issue 10 – p 11

Federal agencies and nursing organizations say it’s high time to put aside preconceptions.
Nursing students and nurses with disabilities face discrimination and bias both in schools of nursing and in the workplace. This can be overt or subtle and can take many forms. In March 2014, nurses spoke up on behalf of, and with, nurses with disabilities at a policy roundtable in Washington, DC, cosponsored by the National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) and the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy. Representatives from several federal agencies and national nursing organizations attended the meeting, where a plan of action was developed through the collaboration of federal agencies, nursing and disability rights organizations, nurse educators, researchers, clinicians, and nurses with disabilities.

Diversity among doctors: Students with disabilities are finding their place in medical schools—and beyond

Diversity among doctors: Students with disabilities are finding their place in medical schools—and beyond
Cathy Gulli
September 25, 2015
For Jessica Dunkley, getting into medical school was no ordinary childhood dream. Deaf since the day she was born, Dunkley aspired to become a doctor when, at age 10, her aunt gave her a plastic human anatomy model with removable organs.
She didn’t think it was possible until, in her mid-20s, she happened to read about deaf doctors practising in the United States. “I realized the opportunity was out there,” and she became “determined to do medicine.” Dunkley applied to numerous medical schools and, in 2010, completed the undergraduate program at the University of Ottawa, where a sign language interpreter accompanied her to class and clinical sessions. Today, Dunkley is finishing her second year of residency in public health and family medicine at the University of Alberta—making her one of the first deaf doctors in Canada.

AccreditedOnlineColleges.org

AccreditedOnlineColleges.org is a general information website with many resources useful to all people looking to further their education. The site discusses the offline and online educational paths one can follow to obtain a degree from an accredited institution. As a valuable resource to anyone interested in pursuing a degree, I thought the project could be of interest to yourself and others who frequently visit your site.

Employer Strategies for Responding to an Aging Workforce

Employer Strategies for Responding to an Aging Workforce

by Francine M. Tishman, Sara Van Looy, and Susanne M. Bruyère

Executive Summary

According to a Government Accountability Office (GAO) report issued in 2006, the number of workers over age 55 is projected to increase significantly over the next 20 years, with this demographic group projected to comprise as much as one-fifth of the nation’s workforce by 2015. The unprecedented aging of the world’s population and the strong correlation between aging and disability challenges many institutions, labor markets, and public pension programs.

Download Entire Document

How is “Disability" Is Defined Differently in Federal Laws for Children & Adults?

How is “Disability” Is Defined Differently in Federal Laws for Children & Adults?

Pathways for Disabled Students to Tertiary Education and Employment: Country Report for the United States

This document is the Country Report produced by the United States in the context of the EDPC activity on Pathways for Disabled Students to Tertiary Education and Employment. It is one in a series of Country Reports prepared by the countries participating in this activity. Each Report is published under the responsibility of the country that has prepared it and the views expressed in this document remain those of the country author(s) and not necessarily those of the OECD or its member countries.

Need Help Finding Support Services?

Need Help Finding Support Services?

View more than
100 organizations nationwide that provide emotional, practical, and financial support services for people with cancer and their families.

Information from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) about support services for people living with cancer and their families. Get connected to more than 100 organizations nationwide that provide emotional, practical, and financial help. You can also get live, online assistance from the NCI’s LiveHelp service.

Top 10 CIO Strategies For Implementing Section 508

Top 10 CIO Strategies For Implementing Section 508

Last Updated: May 5, 2011

1. Adopt a Social Responsibility Perspective for Accessibility
Agencies unintentionally erect barriers to participation and inclusion for people with disabilities; however, a shift in perspective can fundamentally change their approach to accessibility (i.e., the staircase creates the barrier, not the wheelchair). Agencies that adopt a proactive position—actively seeking to prevent access barriers—will do much better than those who address accessibility as an accommodation “they have to do.” 

Have you heard of the Soft Skills Curriculum?

Have you heard of the Soft Skills Curriculum?

Published on May 17, 2012 by US Department of Labor

“Skills to Pay the Bills: Mastering Soft Skills for Workplace Success,” is a curriculum developed by ODEP focused on teaching “soft” or workforce readiness skills to youth, including youth with disabilities. The basic structure of the program is comprised of modular, hands-on, engaging activities that focus on six key skill areas: communication, enthusiasm and attitude, teamwork, networking, problem solving and critical thinking, and professionalism.

For more info on the Soft Skills to Pay the Bills — Mastering Soft Skills for Workplace Success visit: http://www.dol.gov/odep/topics/youth/softskills/.