Do I Have to be Academically Qualified to Enter a Nursing Program, Even if I Have a Disability?

Do I Have to be Academically Qualified to Enter a Nursing Program, Even if I Have a Disability?

Yes, you must be academically qualified. Nursing requires a solid foundation in the humanities, social sciences, and biological sciences, among others, and you will need to come to your nursing program well-prepared in these areas.

If you have a disability and would like to become a nurse, it is good to know your rights. For protection, advocacy, and legal assistance, contact the National Disability Rights Network in your state. For assistance with the ADA, contact the Americans with Disabilities Act Technical Assistance http://adata.org/Static/Home.html. See also Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act.



Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

Where can I find information about financial resources for a nursing student or a nurse with a disability?

Where can I find information about financial resources for a nursing student or a nurse with a disability?

Please explore our site for resources in regard to education, advocacy, and employment www.nond.org/Self_Advocacy/Education.html. For information about how to get a job or get assistance with funding for school, contact your State Vocational Rehabilitation Programs.


Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.


If I Have a Disability, Can I Become a Practical or a Registered Nurse?

  • If I Have a Disability, can I Become a Practical or a Registered Nurse?


See our website on Advocacy Strategies for School. For information about the 2008 amendments to the ADA that broadens coverage for many individuals, see http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/statutes/adaaa_info.cfm. Contact the ADA Center for information on the ADA. Also, the Open the Door, Get ‘Em a Locker film detailing one nursing student’s admission, successful journey, and graduation from a baccalaureate nursing program might be of interest to you. You absolutely can be a nurse, if you are academically qualified. Most of NOND’s Board members are nurses and many of them have disabilities – we did it, so can you!

Where can I find information about financial resources for a nursing student or a nurse with a disability? Please explore our site for resources in regard to education, advocacy, and employment. For information about how to get a job or get assistance with funding for school, contact your State Vocational Rehabilitation Program.


Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.


I Think I've Experienced Discrimination: Where Can I File?

I Think I’ve Experienced Discrimination: Where Can I File?

If the school is private, a complaint can be filed with the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Disability Rights Section.
 
If the school is a state institution, a complaint can be filed with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights (OCR), as state-run higher ed institutions are covered under the Section 504 by the U.S. Department of Education.


Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.



Are Private Schools Subject to the ADA?

Are private schools subject to the ADA?
by Bronwynne Evans
Yes, Title III of the ADA prohibits discrimination in public accommodations. Private schools must eliminate unnecessary eligibility standards that deny access to individuals with disabilities, and make reasonable modifications in policies, practices, and procedures that deny access unless a fundamental alteration in the nature of the program would result. They also must furnish auxiliary aids such as interpreters, notetakers, or readers when necessary to ensure effective communication, unless an undue burden or fundamental alteration would result.

Common Challenges for Nursing Students with Disabilities: Where to Start? Common Challenges for Nursing Students with Disabilities: Where to Start?

  • Common Challenges for Nursing Students with Disabilities: Where to Start?
  • by Beth Marks


Some common challenges for student nurses that we have seen relate to the following:

  1. limited information about accommodations;
  2. uncomfortable asking for accommodations;
  3. not aware of disability student (DS) services or the school has no DS Office;
  4. lack of role models;
  5. no mentors who share his or her disability status to be a resource;
  6. lack of faculty advocates;
  7. not knowing how to or if it is necessary to disclose a disability; and,
  8. not knowing civil rights and rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act (e.g., lack of knowledge as to when and how rights are being violated).



For nurses who acquire a disability in practice, challenges often relate to lack of peer support, unfamiliarity with assistive devices, limited advocacy skills related to requesting accommodations and knowledge of the rights and responsibilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Attitudinal barriers remain the most significant barrier for students and nurses with disabilities. We are still rooted in a medical model of disabilities and have not embraced a socio-political lens for understanding disability, which would allow us to more readily see nurses with disabilities as valued health professionals.

Can I Use a Calculator in Clinical Practice

I Have Dyscalculia: Can I Use a Calculator in School and in Clinical Practice?
by Robin Jones, Director, Great Lakes ADA Center
www.adagreatlakes.org

I think that you have to go back to the analysis of what is being asked: Use of a calculator
What is the question:  Does the use of a calculator create a fundamental alteration in the program or service.  

To Disclose or Not to Disclose?

To Disclose or Not to Disclose?
by Karen McCulloh and Beth Marks

411 on Disability Disclosure
Do you homework before deciding to disclose. The decision of whether to disclose is entirely up to you.

If you need an accommodation you must disclose. This is true for both higher education and employment. So the choice to disclose or not is contingent upon the need for accommodations. 

Technical Standards Versus Essential Functions: Developing Disability-Friendly Policies for Nursing Programs

Technical Standards Versus Essential Functions: Developing Disability-Friendly Policies for Nursing Programs
by Martha Smith

What do technical standards mean for nursing?

Under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, schools can, in fact, have technical standards. Technical Standards are all the non-academic requirements a students must have/meet to enter a program. For most health sciences programs, there are usually a list of skills or experiences students must have prior to entry. Technical Standards cannot be written to exclude a class of people, including students with disabilities, and must have the “tag-line” “able to meet these requirements with or without a reasonable accommodation.” Most schools have difficulty writing good technical standards. They often use physical attributes as a skill, e.g, “must be able to talk to patients directly” versus “must be able to communicate effectively”. Also, technical standards should be written as the “what” of a skill, not the “how”, e.g., “must be able to gather vitals using variety of means” versus “must be able to hear a heart murmur through a stethoscope” (actually specifying how the task will be accomplished). Many technical standards are written based on skills that students will actually learn how to do in the program (e.g., “must be able to hear/detect a heart murmur through a stethoscope”). Because students will learn this skill in school, it is not a requirement for entering the program.

Off to College: Tips for Students with Visual Impairments

Off to College: Tips for Students with Visual Impairments
By Laura Magnuson

College is full of new experiences. You will meet new people, learn new things, and perhaps be away from home for the first time. As a person who has a visual impairment, you may be wondering how you’re going to do it all. How will you pick a good school? How will you find all your books and do all your homework? How are you going to find your way to class? Will you be able to make friends with other students? This article will answer these and other questions.