Job Accommodation Network Releases Publication on Monitoring Reasonable Accommodations

Job Accommodation Network Releases Publication on Monitoring Reasonable Accommodations
http://askjan.org/media/monitoring.html
The Job Accommodation Network (JAN) has published a new document in its Accommodation & Compliance Series: Monitoring Reasonable Accommodations. Employers frequently disregard the importance of monitoring reasonable accommodations after they have been implemented to ensure that they continue to be effective. Accommodations can stop being effective for various reasons, such as: the employee’s limitations change, workplace equipment changes, the job changes, the workplace itself changes, or the accommodation becomes an undue hardship for the employer to continue to provide. This publication offers JAN’s tips for employers to follow and provides a sample form for monitoring accommodations

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Successful Completion of Anesthesia Residency: A Case Report Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Successful Completion of Anesthesia Residency: A Case Report Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Successful Completion of Anesthesia Residency: A Case Report

Michael G. Fitzsimons, MD, Jason C. Brookman, MD, Sarah H. Arnholz, JD, and Keith Baker, MD, PhD

Abstract
Cognitive and physical disabilities among anesthesia residents are not well studied. Cognitive disabilities may often go undiagnosed among trainees, and these trainees may struggle during their graduate medical education. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is an executive function disorder that may manifest as lack of vigilance, an inability to adapt to the rapid changes associated with anesthesia cases, distractibility, an inability to prioritize activities, and even periods of hyperfocusing, among other signs. Programs are encouraged to work closely with residents with such disabilities to develop an educational plan that includes accommodations for their unique learning practices while maintaining the critical aspects of the program. The authors present the management of a case of an anesthesia resident with a diagnosis of ADHD, the perspectives of the trainee, program director, clinical competency director, and the office of general counsel. This article also provides follow-up in the five years since completion of residency.
(C) 2015 by the Association of American Medical Colleges

Physical Limits on CPR Quality and Methods for Quality Improvement

Physical Limits on CPR Quality and Methods for Quality Improvement

This is interesting research suggesting that many people are not able to perform effective CPR because of the amount of force required. This researcher is working on this with the hope that the American Heart Association will start teaching people to do compressions with their foot, which is more effective and less exhausting. His data might be useful to someone with a disability who has been told that they cannot be a nurse without being certified in CPR.

Here’s a little more info if you’re interested:
http://www.slicc.org/ReSS_2013_030.pdf

EEOC Settles with Hospital that Refused Job Accommodation for Nurse with Cancer

Angel Medical Center to Pay $85,000 to Settle EEOC Disability Discrimination Suit
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has settled a disability discrimination lawsuit with Angel Medical Center, Inc. of Franklin, NC. The hospital was charged with violating the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) by denying an employee an accommodation that would have allowed her to get cancer treatments while working full time. The hospital allegedly refused the accommodation request and then fired the nurse.

To learn more about the ADA and other laws that protect the rights of people with disabilities read “Disability.gov’s Guide to Disability Rights Laws.”

Deaf Student Denied Interpreter by Medical School

Deaf Student Denied Interpreter by Medical School

Deaf Student, Denied Interpreter by Medical School, Draws Focus of Advocates

By JOHN ELIGON

Speaking with the parents of a sick infant, Michael Argenyi, a medical student, could not understand why the child was hospitalized. During another clinical training session, he missed most of what a patient with a broken jaw was trying to convey about his condition.

How Can I Find a Good Amplified Stethoscope to Hear Soft Sounds

How Can I Find a Good Amplified Stethoscope to Hear Soft Sounds?

As you probably know, there are many different types of stethoscopes available to student and health professionals. Sometimes it takes trial and error to find the right one, so it may be worthwhile to order a few and check the return policy so the ones that don’t work as well can be returned.

The best source of information on the various stethoscopes can be found at AMPHL Stethoscope Information. Here you will find articles on stethoscopes as well as the various features available. Some work with hearing aids, some with cochlear implants, etc. These websites have additional information on “The Best Amplified Stethoscope for Hard of Hearing Medical Professionals” and “Technical Considerations in Using Stethoscopes

AMPHL Forums
AMPHL (Association of Medical Professionals With Hearing Losses) provides information, promotes advocacy and mentorship, and creates a network for individuals with hearing loss interested in or working in health care fields.

If you have specific questions, join the AMPHL forums and ask other healthcare professionals with hearing loss what they have used and what works and does not work for them. 

What if I Need Assistance with Personal Needs when I am at School or Work in the Clinical Setting?

What if I Need Assistance with Personal Needs when I am at School or Work in the Clinical Setting?

This may be a personal assistant issue and not your school’s or employer’s responsibility.

Below are some specific suggestions on organizations and resources to increase your awareness about your rights and responsibilities:




Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

As a Nurse or Nursing Student Using a Wheelchair, How Can I Perform a "Head-to-Toe" Physical Exam?

As a Nurse or Nursing Student Using a Wheelchair, How Can I Perform a “Head-to-Toe” Physical Exam?

You also may ask your patient to sit in a chair or non-rolling stool for part of the exam, lower the table or bed so that you can reach your patient more easily. Remember that many nurses complete the exam on the patient’s front side first, progressing to the back, which would require you to reposition yourself less frequently.

See how one nursing student using a wheelchair adapted to situations like this in the film entitled Open the Door, Get ‘Em a Locker. In addition, here are some specific suggestions on organizations and resources to increase your awareness about your rights and responsibilities:


If I Use a Wheelchair, How Can I Care for Patients with Contact Precautions?
If I Use a Wheelchair, How Can I Complete a Student Rotation in the Operating Suite?



Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.