The Guide to Assisting Students With Disabilities Equal Access in Health Science and Professional Education

The Guide to Assisting Students With Disabilities Equal Access in Health Science and Professional Education

Lisa M. Meeks, PhD Neera R. Jain, MS, CRC Editors

We highly recommend using this guide with students and the information in the accompanying book chapter for faculty training. We are also in process of developing a faculty training module which should be ready in January. 

We would love your feedback on this guide, especially if you are already using it as an intervention or proactive measure. 

I have placed specific questions below. We plan to use your responses to adjust this tool and to report on its potential as an intervention or proactive approach to improving communication between students and faculty/administration. 

I appreciate any and all feedback, especially direct responses to the following questions (responses will be de-identified, summarized and reported back to this list-serv): 

Questions for administrators and faculty:
1.     What are the major concerns you and your colleagues have about communication with and from students with disabilities?
2.     Do you see the Communication Guide as a useful tool for students? If so, how? If not, why not?
3.     Have you used the Guide with students? If so, what have been the results?
4.     Have you seen improvements in communication among students who have been given the Guide

Lisa M. Meeks, PhD

UCSF School of Medicine
Director, Medical Student Disability Services
Assistant Professor of Medicine
505 Parnassus Avenue, U266, Box 0454
San Francisco, CA 94143 | Phone (
415)-502-5759
lisa.meeks@ucsf.edu | http://sds.ucsf.edu/

Supporting Nurses and Nursing Students with Disabilities

Supporting Nurses and Nursing Students with Disabilities
Neal-Boylan, Leslie PhD, RN, APRN, CRRN, FAAN; Marks, Beth PhD, RN; McCulloh, Karen J. BSN, RN
AJN, American Journal of Nursing:
October 2015 – Volume 115 – Issue 10 – p 11

Federal agencies and nursing organizations say it’s high time to put aside preconceptions.
Nursing students and nurses with disabilities face discrimination and bias both in schools of nursing and in the workplace. This can be overt or subtle and can take many forms. In March 2014, nurses spoke up on behalf of, and with, nurses with disabilities at a policy roundtable in Washington, DC, cosponsored by the National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) and the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy. Representatives from several federal agencies and national nursing organizations attended the meeting, where a plan of action was developed through the collaboration of federal agencies, nursing and disability rights organizations, nurse educators, researchers, clinicians, and nurses with disabilities.

Diversity among doctors: Students with disabilities are finding their place in medical schools—and beyond

Diversity among doctors: Students with disabilities are finding their place in medical schools—and beyond
Cathy Gulli
September 25, 2015
For Jessica Dunkley, getting into medical school was no ordinary childhood dream. Deaf since the day she was born, Dunkley aspired to become a doctor when, at age 10, her aunt gave her a plastic human anatomy model with removable organs.
She didn’t think it was possible until, in her mid-20s, she happened to read about deaf doctors practising in the United States. “I realized the opportunity was out there,” and she became “determined to do medicine.” Dunkley applied to numerous medical schools and, in 2010, completed the undergraduate program at the University of Ottawa, where a sign language interpreter accompanied her to class and clinical sessions. Today, Dunkley is finishing her second year of residency in public health and family medicine at the University of Alberta—making her one of the first deaf doctors in Canada.

Physical Limits on CPR Quality and Methods for Quality Improvement

Physical Limits on CPR Quality and Methods for Quality Improvement

This is interesting research suggesting that many people are not able to perform effective CPR because of the amount of force required. This researcher is working on this with the hope that the American Heart Association will start teaching people to do compressions with their foot, which is more effective and less exhausting. His data might be useful to someone with a disability who has been told that they cannot be a nurse without being certified in CPR.

Here’s a little more info if you’re interested:
http://www.slicc.org/ReSS_2013_030.pdf

Attitudes of staff nurse preceptors related to the education of nurses with learning disabilities in clinical settings

by L’Ecuyer, Kristine Marie, Ph.D., SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY, 2014, 212 pages; 3624082
Abstract:
This dissertation presents a quantitative study of the attitudes of staff nurse preceptors toward nursing students with learning disabilities. There are an increased number of nursing students with learning disabilities. These students may have additional challenges in clinical settings, particularly if clinical settings do not understand or support their educational needs. Stigma exists towards people with learning disabilities, and it is unclear if staff nurse preceptors are accepting of nursing students with learning disabilities and willing to serve as a preceptor.
Attitude was measured with the following four constructs developed for this study: perceived levels of preceptor preparedness, level of confidence in implementation of preceptor role, preceptor beliefs of student potential, and agreement with the provision of reasonable accommodations. These constructs were developed through a review of the literature and found to best represent the dynamic relationship between the preceptor and the preceptee.

LearnHowToBecome.org

LearnHowToBecome.org, recently published a new guide to nursing careers and degree programs. The guide begins with a comprehensive view of the larger nursing landscape, and then dives deeper into the field’s many specializations, including registered nurses, licensed practical and vocational nurses, nurse practitioners, neonatal nurses and more. For each specialization, the guide examines the following elements:

  • Roles and responsibilities
  • Essential skills
  • Common and recommended educational paths
  • Career advancement
  • Salary by state and level
  • Related careers


The new guide was researched and written by Marijke Durning, a nurse educator, administrator, and former clinical nurse with years of medical education and experience. To read through the guide and learn more about Marijke, please visit the following page: 
 
Nursing degrees and careers:
 
Registered Nurse degrees and careers:

Think College

ThinkCollege.net

Think College is a national organization dedicated to developing, expanding, and improving inclusive higher education options for people with intellectual disability. With a commitment to equity and excellence, Think College supports evidence-based and student centered research and practice by generating and sharing knowledge, guiding institutional change, informing public policy, and engaging with students, professionals and families. Click to learn more about our various grant projects.

Deaf Medical Student Wins ADA Case Against Creighton

Deaf Medical Student Wins ADA Case Against Creighton

On September 4, 2013, Michael Argenyi, a deaf medical student, represented by the National Association of the Deaf (NAD), the law firm of Stein & Vargas and Disability Rights Nebraska, won a jury trial against Creighton University in the United States District Court for the District of Nebraska. Mr. Argenyi had been a student in the medical school at Creighton University beginning in 2009, and had requested that Creighton University provide him with real time captioning for classes and oral interpreters for clinics. Creighton refused to provide him with such services and also refused to allow Mr. Argenyi to bring interpreters even if he paid for the interpreters himself.

Deaf Student Denied Interpreter by Medical School

Deaf Student Denied Interpreter by Medical School

Deaf Student, Denied Interpreter by Medical School, Draws Focus of Advocates

By JOHN ELIGON

Speaking with the parents of a sick infant, Michael Argenyi, a medical student, could not understand why the child was hospitalized. During another clinical training session, he missed most of what a patient with a broken jaw was trying to convey about his condition.

Additional Federal Attention Needed to Help Protect Access for Students with Disabilities

Charter schools enrolled a lower percentage of students with disabilities than traditional public schools, but little is known about the factors contributing to these differences. In school year 2009-2010, which was the most recent data available at the time of our review, approximately 11 percent of students enrolled in traditional public schools were students with disabilities compared to about 8 percent of students enrolled in charter schools.
Read GAO Report: Additional Federal Attention Needed to Help Protect Access for Students with Disabilities