Supporting Nurses and Nursing Students with Disabilities

Supporting Nurses and Nursing Students with Disabilities
Neal-Boylan, Leslie PhD, RN, APRN, CRRN, FAAN; Marks, Beth PhD, RN; McCulloh, Karen J. BSN, RN
AJN, American Journal of Nursing:
October 2015 – Volume 115 – Issue 10 – p 11

Federal agencies and nursing organizations say it’s high time to put aside preconceptions.
Nursing students and nurses with disabilities face discrimination and bias both in schools of nursing and in the workplace. This can be overt or subtle and can take many forms. In March 2014, nurses spoke up on behalf of, and with, nurses with disabilities at a policy roundtable in Washington, DC, cosponsored by the National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) and the Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy. Representatives from several federal agencies and national nursing organizations attended the meeting, where a plan of action was developed through the collaboration of federal agencies, nursing and disability rights organizations, nurse educators, researchers, clinicians, and nurses with disabilities.

Employer Strategies for Responding to an Aging Workforce

Employer Strategies for Responding to an Aging Workforce

by Francine M. Tishman, Sara Van Looy, and Susanne M. Bruyère

Executive Summary

According to a Government Accountability Office (GAO) report issued in 2006, the number of workers over age 55 is projected to increase significantly over the next 20 years, with this demographic group projected to comprise as much as one-fifth of the nation’s workforce by 2015. The unprecedented aging of the world’s population and the strong correlation between aging and disability challenges many institutions, labor markets, and public pension programs.

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Top 10 CIO Strategies For Implementing Section 508

Top 10 CIO Strategies For Implementing Section 508

Last Updated: May 5, 2011

1. Adopt a Social Responsibility Perspective for Accessibility
Agencies unintentionally erect barriers to participation and inclusion for people with disabilities; however, a shift in perspective can fundamentally change their approach to accessibility (i.e., the staircase creates the barrier, not the wheelchair). Agencies that adopt a proactive position—actively seeking to prevent access barriers—will do much better than those who address accessibility as an accommodation “they have to do.” 

Have you heard of the Soft Skills Curriculum?

Have you heard of the Soft Skills Curriculum?

Published on May 17, 2012 by US Department of Labor

“Skills to Pay the Bills: Mastering Soft Skills for Workplace Success,” is a curriculum developed by ODEP focused on teaching “soft” or workforce readiness skills to youth, including youth with disabilities. The basic structure of the program is comprised of modular, hands-on, engaging activities that focus on six key skill areas: communication, enthusiasm and attitude, teamwork, networking, problem solving and critical thinking, and professionalism.

For more info on the Soft Skills to Pay the Bills — Mastering Soft Skills for Workplace Success visit: http://www.dol.gov/odep/topics/youth/softskills/.

How Can I Find a Nursing Job if I Stutter?

How Can I Find a Nursing Job if I Stutter?

Please explore our website for resources:

  • For protection, advocacy, and legal assistance, contact your state National Disability Rights Network. Be sure to click on your state so that you get relevant and timely information. Also check out your rights under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.
  • Please explore our website for resources in regard to education, advocacy, and work.
  • For assistance with the ADA, contact the Americans with Disabilities Act Technical Assistance Centers. Tell them what is happening and ask about interviewing resources that would support you and ask to practice responses with them that would follow discriminatory statements from employers.
  • Learning about the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 will help you to understand how the ADAAA broadens coverage for many individuals.
  • Connections with people with disabilities in your community, contact your local Center for Independent Living. Find a nurse mentor with a disability in your area who will let you practice interviewing skills and give you suggestions; contact former faculty/instructors as advocates to open doors, and become a strong advocate for yourself by knowing your rights and responsibilities under the ADA. During future interviews, de-emphasize your speech impairment and focus on skills, knowledge, and motivation.
  • Information about how to get a job, contact State Vocational Rehabilitation Program or the Job Accommodation Network.




Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

Can Employers Require Pre-Employment Physicals?

Can Employers Require Pre-Employment Physicals?

What do I do if I feel I have been discriminated against as a result of the physical?

Please explore our website for resources in regard to education, advocacy, and work. For assistance with the ADA, contact the Americans with Disabilities Act Technical Assistance Centers. Learning about the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 will help you to understand how the ADAAA broadens coverage for many individuals.

For protection, advocacy, and legal assistance, contact your state National Disability Rights Network. Be sure to click on your state so that you get relevant and timely information. Also check out your rights under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

For connections with people with disabilities in your community, contact your local Center for Independent Living.

For information about how to get a job, contact State Vocational Rehabilitation Program or the Job Accommodation Network.

Under the ADA, employers can require pre-employment physicals. The extent of the physicals and the reason for them must be consistent with business practice and job-related. Physicals should be looking at function, not diagnosis. i.e, does this candidate have the ability to perform the essential functions of the job for which they are applying? Such physicals must be the same for every applicant for the same position, or employers will have a difficult time showing they were not treating you differently, presumably because of a “perceived” disability.
 
Employers should not ask, “Do you have a condition that needs accommodation?” but they can ask, “Can you perform the essential functions of this job with or without a reasonable accommodation?” If you feel you have been treated unfairly, you can file an internal grievance with the agency’s Affirmative Action department, stating that you feel you received disparate treatment as a result of your “perceived” disability. That might result in additional training for the agency around ADA issues.
 
Another place to make formal complaints is the Bureau of Labor and Industry in your state. By filing a complaint with BOL, you are addressing both state and federal employment issues. You also can file a complaint with the EEOC (federal). If you file with EEOC or BOLI it is important to be clear about your goal. It may be to get a job, or to get punitive damages related to stress, or to require the agency to get additional training on ADA issues.



Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

What Jobs in Nursing Can I do if I Have Physical Limitations?

What Jobs in Nursing Can I do if I Have Physical Limitations?

Please explore our website for resources in regard to education, advocacy, and work.

For information about how to get a job or get through school, contact your State Vocational Rehabilitation Program. and Job Accommodation Network. There are more and more nursing jobs for people with physical limitations. Here are some suggestions:

  • Legal consultation (training is available on-line)
  • Lactation consultant
  • Occupational health
  • Psychiatric or mental health nursing
  • Case management
  • Triage at a home care agency
  • Quality assurance reviews
  • Chart reviews for a nursing home
  • Drug reviews or physical exams for insurance companies
  • On-line teaching for masters or doctorally-prepared nursing faculty
  • Protocol reviews for research projects
  • If you want part-time, interview only for part time or find another nurse who can share the job with you.
  • While you are looking for a job:
  • Do not let your license lapse. You cannot practice without a renewal, which generally involves taking a refresher course requiring clinical hours.
  • Keep up with your continuing education credits (CEUs) if required by your State Board of Nursing.
  • Think about going on for an advanced degree so that you may teach part time at a community college or in a CNA course.


For protection, advocacy, and legal assistance, contact your state National Disability Rights Network. Be sure to click on your state so that you get relevant and timely information. For assistance with the ADA, contact the Americans with Disabilities Act Technical Assistance Centers. Learning about the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 will help you to understand how the ADAAA broadens coverage for many individuals.



Disclaimer: The National Organization of Nurses with Disabilities (NOND) does not offer legal advice but NOND does offer resources to help you understand your rights, protections, and responsibilities within various Disability Rights Laws.

Can I Use a Calculator in Clinical Practice

I Have Dyscalculia: Can I Use a Calculator in School and in Clinical Practice?
by Robin Jones, Director, Great Lakes ADA Center
www.adagreatlakes.org

I think that you have to go back to the analysis of what is being asked: Use of a calculator
What is the question:  Does the use of a calculator create a fundamental alteration in the program or service.